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Myrtle Beach’s History

February 15, 2018
Category: Tourist Attractions

The history of Myrtle Beach is not as well documented as some other regions in the state and across the country. This is partly because little is known about the tribes that inhabited the areas in and around Myrtle Beach prior to the failed Spanish settlement and the subsequent successful English settlement, which preceded the waves of explorations and eventual colonization.

History of Myrtle Beach

It is widely believed and also accepted by historians that the Waccamaw and the Winyah Indians were the early inhabitants of the region. They called the place ‘Chicora,’ which literally means the land. What later became Kings Highway was originally a trail used by Indians. Kings Highway became a prominent route for European colonizers and settlers to travel southward to Savannah and Charleston. In recent times, major treasure-troves have been discovered from around the region, including pottery and arrowheads that offer more insight into the ways of life of the Native Americans. However, there is still not much information about their population or how widespread their settlements were.

The first settlement along the Grand Strand was spearheaded by Lucas Vasques de Allyon. This was the first European colony on the continent. The Spaniards had a horrible time as disease infected almost all of them and reportedly they all died in the first year of settling in. The English were luckier as they didn’t just survive but initiated multiple settlements and also started trading along the coast of South Carolina. This was the early eighteenth century, and the ever-growing trade on the high seas fuelled piracy.

It is along the coastal waters of South Carolina, beyond the Grand Strand and Myrtle Beach, where the tales of the legendary pirate Blackbeard were born. The man known as Edward Teach was given the name Blackbeard for the pitch-black color of his beard. Myrtle Beach also has a relationship with Drunken Jack who is believed to have been marooned on an island with nothing but a large stash of rum, which was of course stolen. He died on the island, unlike Captain Jack Sparrow who made miraculous escapes time and again in the popular film franchise.

Stay at Sea Horn Inn & Suites

The development of Georgetown, Horry County and the eventual incorporation of Myrtle Beach as a city in 1957 are well documented. Named after the abundant myrtle trees growing along the coast, the city today welcomes more than fourteen million visitors every year. Sea Horn Inn & Suites offers affordable beachfront accommodation at Myrtle Beach. Book your stay online to get the best deal.

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